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New Year, New You: Getting off to a great start

10:00 PM, Jan 2, 2012   |    comments
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To start the weeklong series, Heidi got some advice on eating right and working out from 9Health Medical Reporter Dr. John Torres.

Since the key to good health starts in the kitchen Dr. John offers these tips on cleaning up your diet:

1) Eat breakfast, and no, coffee doesn't count. The best breakfast includes whole grains, fiber, and protein. Cereal and protein bars can get the job done if you're in a pinch, but don't rely on them daily. Also, go easy on the sugar. Sugary cereals, pastries, and heaps of the white stuff added to your coffee can be bad for the waistline. Women should only consume 20 grams of sugar or less daily. Men should keep it to 36 grams or less.

2) Pass on processed foods. Real food is not only far more nutritious, a homemade lunch of veggies and lean proteins is guaranteed to contain less sodium. Unless, you enjoy retaining water like the Hoover Dam, it's best to skip the frozen entrée or can of soup and crackers when you can, opting for turkey sandwich on wheat, or salad with chicken.

3) Conquer the vending machine dilemma. It's 2:30 and your stomach is roaring like a 737. It's OK to retreat to the vending machine in a pinch, but choose wisely. Pretzels can be a good pick over chips, and as tempting as they can be, the powdered donuts should always stay put.

Looking to pump some iron in the New Year? Maybe add some cardio into your routine? Dr. John lends these recommendations:

1) Get moving. Whether you sign up for a gym membership or get out and use the gym of the world, we all need to get our hearts pumping (aerobic) and flex our muscles (strength training).

2) Cardio. The suggested minimum is 150 minutes a week of moderate intensity workout. This can be split up over several days, or done in longer increments.

3) Lifting weights. The minimum recommendation is two days a week. Women especially can benefit from strength training. In younger women this is important to build bone strength, and as women get older, it can combat the progression of weakening muscles which can result in other problems.

Stay tuned to 9NEWS at 4 p.m. and 9 p.m. all this week for more on the New Year, New You series.

(KUSA-TV © 2012 Multimedia Holdings Corporation)

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